Writers: Are You Living a Psychologically Rich Life?

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AHA!

Yesterday I came across a fascinating article and had a major Aha! moment. Written by Bella DePaulo, PhD, and published on the website Solo Living (wearesololiving.com), Dr. DePaulo separates out the personality types and characteristics of people who are single by choice (yes, this is a ‘thing’ and it’s not bad) and who prefer to live alone from those who live more conformist lifestyles.

“According to Kierkegaard, a married person with a secure, well-respected job and children may have a happy and (in many respects) meaningful life, but not necessarily a life rich in diverse perspective-changing experiences. Although most people choose such a conventional, secure, and well-respected life, others… choose the esthetic wanderer’s life instead—unconventional, unstable, and uncompromising.”

Is This You?

According to Dr. DePaulo, there are three key characteristics of a psychologically rich life: “variety, interestingness and perspective-changing experiences.” What kind of people live psychologically rich lives? According to the article, these people are curious, open to experiences and who experience emotions (negative and positive) more intensely. Does this sound familiar? Writers, or any person involved in artistic endeavors, would certainly fit into this mold. I know I do.

“At least three personality characteristics typify people who lead psychologically rich lives:

  • They are curious.

  • They are open to experience (e.g., they have unconventional attitudes, artistic sensitivity, intellectual curiosity, flexibility, depth of feeling).

  • They experience emotions intensely, both positive and negative ones.”

A light bulb came on and suddenly I made connections with issues I’ve been dealing with for years. Years of struggling because I was ‘different’, because I didn’t fit into the conformist mold that my parents and family members expected. With being more broad-minded, artistic, and so on, I’ve struggled with feeling accepted. For years I’ve felt like a failure because I couldn’t start a business (building a structured environment and all of its details = conformist personality). Now, I realized, I can work in an established business (working inside an already-built structured environment = adaptable/flexible to my surroundings). That changes everything. And it has a name: psychologically rich.

“…psychological richness is the kind of wealth that can contribute to a truly good life.”

To Be or Not to Be…

Some of you may fit into one of the other personality types (happy and meaningful), but if you’re artistic, I doubt it, unless you’re lying to yourself about who you really are. People who live happy lives (or so they think) need comfort and security (white picket fence, 2.5 kids, house in the ‘burbs, etc.). People who live meaningful lives must have significance and purpose as goals. Either way, both of these require a level of conformity and maintenance of static relationships. Living solo frees us from the confines of these personality types.

Do you prefer a happy life? Then you’re going to need time, money (discretionary income) and relationships (romantic, business, platonic, etc.) with the same people over and over again. Maybe you’d prefer living a meaningful life: do you have strong moral principles, broad-based relationships (including networking) and are you consistent? Put plainly, people who prefer to lead happy lives get personal satisfaction (of living up to parents’ and societal standards); people who prefer meaningful lives get to contribute to society in some way (think scientific, medical discoveries and such).

The Best Way to Go, In My (Expert) Opinion

If you want to live a psychologically rich life, expect to be curious, have time on your hands, have plenty of energy and be spontaneous. Novel activities will take precedence over rote tasks and there is a preference for challenging activities where one actually learns and engages. This equates to the gaining of wisdom; this circles us back to the point that this type of life offers a richness beyond material wealth and conformist security.

In summary, people who prefer the solo life generally have many of the characteristics of the psychologically rich mindset. This article validated who I am at my deepest core and taught me to accept that my differences are exactly what enrich my life.

What about you?

#wearesololiving #thesololife #soloadventures #singleandlovingit #writerslife #bloggers #creativityrocks #wednesdaywisdom #solopreneurs #bloggingaboutlife #psychologytoday

A Time for Storytelling and Rest

cherokee bonfire

Source: Google Images/visitcherokeenc.com

Winter is a special time, a time of quiet, a time of slowing down and doing more indoor activities like yoga, reading and writing. It’s also the time of year for storytelling in many traditions, especially for Indigenous Peoples. In the old days (and still, for many nations), it was a time marked by the first snowfall or the Winter solstice. Bands of tribes gathered together to share their stories and pass their histories on to the next generation.

Days of hunting and gathering food for winter stores were over; cold winds blew across the prairies and mountains and the days were shorter. What else was there to do? Stories both entertained and informed; they carried a people’s history with them wherever they went. Oral tradition is still revered today. Regardless of your ancestry, storytelling is alive and well in many cultures around the world and you would do well by touching base with yours. Storytelling long preceded the written word, which forced people to use their brains to retain an amazing amount of detail surrounding important events in their lives.

Do you and your family or friends gather for the purpose of sharing during the winter months? In these modern times, we’re busy working, running errands or are too tired. Storytelling traditions force us to slow down and take the time to LISTEN. When we allow ourselves to participate in this ancient form of socialization, we are energized and connected to something much larger than each of us.

Winter is also a time of rest though skiers and snowboarders might disagree. When was the last time you bundled up (assuming you don’t live in FL) and took a walk in the snow? It’s one of the quietest, most Zen experiences I’ve ever had. If you listen very carefully, you can even hear the snow fall.

This is the embodiment of winter: slow down, listen (to family, friends, your body), rest (to rejuvenate for the spring) and eat deeply nourishing meals (soups, stews).

Indigenous Peoples have had this down for eons and I think it’s time the rest of us catch up. Take some time out for yourself this winter. Rest (it may be four letters but it’s not a dirty word). Read. Write. Appreciate the shorter days and quiet moments. It is in these spaces where we can find peace and contentment to last us throughout the year.

#writers #wintersolstice #storytelling #restandrelaxation #authors #yogapractice #reading #writingcommunity #writersgottawrite 

Oh Pooh…On Copyrights

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Source: Google Images/goalcast.com

The Masters are Freed

This morning a bit of interesting news landed in my Inbox from Smithsonian Magazine. Creative works published in 1926 (authors, songwriters, playwrights, etc.) are, as of 01.01.2022, available and free to use as we please. No more copyright. That means a lot of artists’ works will enter the public domain this year. What does that mean for current writers, painters, movie makers and such? I cringe at the thought of someone turning a masterpiece like The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway into something unrecognizable.

For instance, The Great Gatsby entered the public domain last year and someone wrote a graphic novel adaptation. I haven’t read it so I don’t know how much the story was changed (time period, characters, etc.). What this does tell me is that original works, masterpieces dare I say, could end up as some sci-fi adventure or even anime – or worse. I worry that instead of coming up with something unique, poor replication and representation will ensue.

Then again, maybe not. 

Pooh On Public Domain

Writer Benjamin Hoff authored The Tao of Pooh and later The Te of Piglet based on the wonderful stories of A.A. Milne, author and creator of Winnie the Pooh. I thoroughly enjoyed reading both books. Because of copyright laws, Hoff agreed to pay the Milne estate thirty percent of the hardcover profits and forty percent of the paperback profits. If he wrote either book this year, he would pay nothing and reap all the benefits of a long-beloved classic. (Note: the cartoon films are still copyright protected because they’re owned by Disney.)

Which makes me wonder:

Will unencumbered profits become a motivating factor in rehashing old classics?

“The things that make me different are the things that make me.” — Winnie the Pooh

Not a Thief, Just Borrowing

Poems by Dorothy Parker and Langston Hughes are also now in the public domain. Sounds like a ripe opportunity for some people to plagiarize and they will be free to do it without consequences. Ethically speaking, I can’t imagine stealing a single line of poetry from the likes of T.S. Elliot or stories from the likes of John Muir or Henry Thoreau. It just doesn’t feel right. Can you imagine The Sound of Music or The Maltese Falcon revamped? Blasphemy!

Okay, perhaps I’m being a bit melodramatic (well, I am an artist)…but the concern is all too real. I suppose we’ll have to wait and see what happens when a classic meets a modern artist. Keeping my fingers crossed.

#aamilne #winniethepooh #ernesthemingway #dorothyparker #langstonhughes #publicdomain #copyrightlaws #taoofpooh #classicnovels

Will The Real Rudolph Please Shine His Nose…

Rudolph book cover

Source: NPR/Rauner Special Collections Library/Dartmouth College

I came across this NPR story some time ago on an IG post. What is Christmas without Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer? How many of you know the real story of how he came about? Let me summarize…

The Real Story

It all began in 1939 (yes, that long ago and on the verge of WWII) when Montgomery Ward execs asked one of their ad men to come up with a story for MW’s children’s book, an annual holiday promotion. The ad man, Robert May, made a list of possible names before settling on Rudolph. So May, an aspiring novelist and known for his wit at parties, came up with a story of a reindeer underdog named Rudolph. His boss wasn’t very impressed but May, undaunted, went to a friend in MW’s art department to draw up some sketches to go with the story.

Names of Rudolph

Courtesy of NPR/Rauner Special Collections Library/Dartmouth College

Then something awful happened. May’s wife died of cancer. He was devastated but forged ahead, telling his boss that he “needed Rudolph now more than ever” after his boss offered to give the project to someone else. Rudolph was a big hit and copies sold around the country. But by now May was in deep financial straits from his wife’s medical bills and was trying support himself and his child on a copywriter’s salary.

The Big Hit

For reasons that remain unclear, the CEO of Montgomery Ward gave May the rights to Rudolph after WWII. May’s brother-in-law was a songwriter, so May enlisted him to write a jingle about Rudolph. Miraculously, it was loved and picked up by none other than the famous singing cowboy Gene Autry. As a result, Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer sold over 25 million copies and was later picked up by Rankin/Bass, who made the stop animation film we all adore (I watch it every year).

If you’re curious, you can follow this link to the whole story, including reading the original book/story that was changed oh-so-slightly for the Rankin/Bass film:

https://www.npr.org/2013/12/25/256579598/writing-rudolph-the-original-red-nosed-manuscript

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, to one and all. Stay safe and healthy and prosperous wishes for the New Year.

#Christmas #Rudolphtherednosedreindeer #RankinBass #Christmastime #holidayseason #RobertLMay #holidayclassic #fictionwriters

Supporting Local Authors is Good for Business

A Reason to Go Local

I’m sure many of you watched the news about the devastating tornadoes, including the leveling of an Amazon warehouse in Illinois. Upon seeing the destroyed warehouse, one of my first thoughts, after concern for survivors, was “Oh man, lots of people will be angry about their Xmas packages not arriving on time.” Gifts and gotta-have-it-now items purchased online from other parts of the country, other parts of the world. It’s a “Xmas fever” that spreads around much of the world for a short season and repeats itself year to year.

Then it got me thinking…

For many years I’ve enjoyed shopping locally (I find more unique items this way) and these disastrous events have certainly emphasized my choice. I love supporting local businesses, especially those hit hard by the pandemic. You can go to a local bookstore or business and pick out the gifts yourself. I like the personal touch; I feel it gives the gift a greater meaning if I took the time to pick it out, take it home and wrap it.

Less Really Is More

Mass material consumerism has reached an all-time ‘low’, in my opinion. We have football stadium-sized warehouses where people toil under the digital gun (their movements are tracked and timed every minute of every day) to get your purchases to you ASAP. This harkens back to the factory laborers of the early twentieth century (with not much more labor protections, it seems). Complaints about late deliveries even though there’s a huge labor shortage (which some folks refuse to recognize), issues with availability of raw materials, etc., persist with no end in sight. Keeping your shopping local may decrease your purchase options but increases the opportunity to meet your neighbors and find unusual treasures.

Local Support Strengthens a Community

One way to resolve this global issue is to help our own community members thrive and supporting local authors is a good way to start.  Many towns and cities often have yearly events that introduce local authors to the community. I was one such fortunate author when I lived in New Mexico, where I published my first book (it even won an award!). What a wonderful way to meet readers and other writers and discover new stories.

While much of writers’ works have gone digital (eBooks, Audible, etc.), I feel it vital to support as many members of our local writing communities as possible. Small or local bookstores, libraries and cafes are often great places to meet local writers and authors via book readings or writing groups (professional, Meetup. etc.). Grab a cuppa and have a listen.

Show Your Local Library Some Love

Another wonderful way to support authors (both local and worldwide) is through your public library. I find them an amazing source of discovery and entertainment. This week I discovered a new Asian author, Gail Tsukiyama; I took home two of her books: The Language of Threads and The Street of a Thousand Blossoms. Libraries offer a wide variety of books from local authors to best-selling authors and everyone in between. And it’s a great place to review a book before going to the bookstore to make a purchase.

Post Script:

(Yes, large companies like Amazon provide jobs and help boost the U.S. economy (GDP); they may be, in some places, the only option for employment. That’s not the focus of this post and I continue to support buying locally so we can boost our local economies, which in turn will have a positive effect on the national GDP.)

#writersoffiction #supportyourlocalauthors #placergoldwriters #writersdigest #meetupgroups #poetry #buylocal

The Long and Short of It

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Vintage Alphabet Source: Google Images/pixiepaperstore.com

Growing up before the Internet and a digital world, my generation learned much via “the old-fashioned way” – like cursive and script writing. I have vivid memories of the Roman alphabet in upper and lower case bordering the chalkboards of my grade school classrooms.

Sister Rose de Saint Marie taught our second-grade penmanship classes and she was a typical hard-nosed teacher/Catholic nun. I religiously (pun intended) practiced my penmanship at school and at home. (Which is why, all these decades later, I’m still complimented on my handwriting.) There were two classrooms for grades 1 through 8 and penmanship was taught daily at least until sixth or seventh grade in our Catholic grammar school. I even remember the paper we used: solid lines on the top and bottom for the upper and lower parts of the capital letters and dotted lines in the middle for the lower case letters. 

This morning, as I filled out a financial document, I realized that a pen in my hand felt a bit strange. I don’t like that. I spend less and less time writing longhand, whether in cursive or script, unless I’m leaving a note to myself on my desk. When I do pick up a pen, I hesitate for the briefest moment as I reach into my deepest memory bank for that familiar sensory memory. It’s as if I’m forgetting how to sign my name with the characteristic loops and artistic flairs that have long been my mark. Losing my longhand skills means, to me, losing a sense of myself.

We are losing the personal touch, the individual-ness of each human, becoming less so as AI infiltrates our lives. Google is the answer to EVERYTHING, it seems. Can’t spell a word? Google it. Not sure if it’s a verb or adverb? Google it. The internet has short-circuited our ability to learn via sensory memory (touch, taste, smell, etc.) and in the process something very personal, unique to each of us, is lost.

“When I do pick up a pen, I hesitate for the briefest moment as I reach into my deepest memory bank for that familiar sensory memory.”

J.K. Rowling wrote the Harry Potter books in longhand and still writes that way. Imagine the difficulty in maintaining the pace of your writing with what’s whizzing through your mind as the story unfolds. How many writers today are even willing to attempt such an undertaking? Still quite a few, thankfully.

“A friend of mine who’s a film director turned me on to the Blackwing 602. What I like is that it sharpens to a really fine point, and it’s got a great feel to it that I just can’t describe. It’s like when you taste a really good wine or a cognac: You know it’s good stuff.”

Andre Dubus III, author of Bluesman and House of Sand and Fog

For me, the Digital Age provides too many shortcuts, too many quick ways around learning what we need to learn. Forget working out a math problem with a pencil and paper; now Brainly will do it for you. But what is lost in the process? We lose the concept of critical thinking; how to get from point A to point B. Working out a problem, like writing in longhand, allows our brains and minds to problem-solve, which translates into many other areas of our lives as we grow. We can’t afford to lose it or I fear we’ll lose some of our humanity.

“A pen is a much more primitive instrument. You feel that the words are coming out of your body and then you dig the words into the page. Writing has always had that tactile quality for me. It’s a physical experience.”

Paul Auster, author (https://www.standoutbooks.com/writing-longhand/)

Writing longhand is a form of sensory memory and connects us to each word in a story and the story itself, as a whole. It fortifies memory and the ability to spell, to slow us down enough that we get the story on paper without too many revisions. We become more deeply engaged in our stories.

“Studies have shown that writing (and rewriting) information in longhand is one of the most effective ways to retain new information; this is apparently because writing the old-fashioned way stimulates a part of the brain called the reticular activating system, or the RAS.”

Fred Johnson, at https://www.standoutbooks.com/writing-longhand/ (and yes, he “Googled” this information)

Laptops may allow for the collection and storage of information – but on the laptop, not in our brains. Efficiency is nice but LEARNING and RETENTION are more important. So in the best interest of humanity – pick up a pen or pencil and have at it.

Deepen your writing, deepen yourself.

A quick post-script (11/4):

I was so enamored with the thought of getting back into longhand I purchased some sleek cedar-scented graphite pencils. What a joy to use! Brought back some nice childhood memories… and inspired me to write this little ode to pencils:

The Poetry of Pencil

Smooth charcoal, cedar scent

a cherished childhood of homework spent

writing and re-writing until perfection or corrections attained;

Mathematical problems, grammatical errors

erased with ease;

Sharpened stylus dulled with use,

scratching numbers and letter in columns and rows,

learning my ABCs and 2+2s.

#ABCs #handwriting #longhand #scriptandcursive #writinglonghand #writerswrite #pencilsandpens #charcoal #romanalphabet #sensorymemory #RAS #artificialintelligence #grammar #harrypotterbooks #authorswhowritelonghand

Find Inspiration With a Vision Board

vision board1

Source: Google Images/https://www.google.com/www.lisareneejohnson.com

Last night I watched a movie titled “The Women” starring Meg Ryan and Annette Benning. Meg Ryan’s character was a designer who worked at her father’s firm. Long story short, he eventually let her go and she decided to start her own design firm. What’s the first thing she did? Started a vision board, of course. Using time-lapsed video, you can see her adding ideas and inspirations to the vision board: colors, sketches, the name of her business, etc. I know movies love to show how everything always works out for the protagonist but real life isn’t always so rosy. A vision board, however, is realistic and doable and helps one stay focused.

Vision boards can be inspirational and help us stay focused and reach goals. Years ago, I created my first vision board after realizing that lists never worked out for me. To be honest, it didn’t go well; perhaps I had too many goals going in too many directions. Or maybe I didn’t put the board together quite right (if there is a ‘right’ way). Could be any number of reasons why my goals on the board didn’t materialize. Seeing one in the movie inspired me to try again. Perhaps I was too worried about a specific order of the pictures and phrases; maybe I need to be more random with placement.

So I’ll give it another shot. I’ll focus more on the ideas and goals rather than the placement. I tend to get distracted by the orderliness and lose sight of what’s important – the goals to be accomplished.

To writers and creatives: do you have this problem as well? Our minds tend to be in overdrive much of the time so a vision board might be ‘just what the doctor ordered.’ Can’t hurt; if nothing else, it can bring new perspectives to your life and perhaps clarity as well. And with all those creative thoughts whizzing about, clarity would be a good thing. Let a vision board help turn your life in a better direction!

I’m old-fashioned and I like to touch the items for my board (there’s that tactile learning common in artists). If you prefer a digital version, there’s a template at PicMonkey. If you need help changing your thoughts, this site will help you create the vision board you need. Don’t focus on perfection, focus on what inspires and motivates you to reach your goals. Visualize them, then put them on your board.

Get creating!

#visionboard #create #writers #makeacollage #positiveaffirmations #inspiration

At A Loss For Words

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Van Gogh’s Sunflowers – my rendition

I’ve been negligent of this blog for some time now – mea culpa. It’s our busy season at work and at the end of each day I’m exhausted. “Gettin’ old ain’t for sissies” is a phrase of wisdom, indeed. That and I’ve been at a loss for words as to what to write. I’ve covered so many topics these past five years I’m wondering if I’ve got anything left to share. 

Creation Comes in Many Forms

I haven’t worked on any of my writing projects but I have picked up painting again. It all started at work with a co-worker who is an amazing artist and calligrapher. She does all of our signs BY HAND. At first, I used to stare at them wondering whether they were pre-printed by the company. The symmetry in her calligraphy is impressive. So I started thinking about the two paintings I did a couple years ago – one landscape, one abstract (neither was very good but we all have to start somewhere). I decided to take a creative slant to my work apron (many co-workers sport a variety of artistic designs) but I wanted to design something no one else had so I drew and painted what is called a Chinese blue-green dragon (Xiao Qing Long). Next to the dragon is the Chinese character for “good fortune.”

It woke my long-dormant creative juices and I’m now planning on painting some aprons for co-workers I like. While at Michael’s (the art store) last week to buy a sharpie for work, I noticed an array of adult paint-by-number kits of various pictures: Van Gogh’s Sunflowers, his Starry Night, and a few others peppered with general landscape pictures. I chose Van Gogh’s Sunflowers (work in progress above) because it’s one of my favorites – and he’s one of my favorite painters. If only I’d known then what I’d gotten myself into!

The project is quite detailed and after five nights of  2-4 hours of painting (teeny tiny slithery shapes) I’m still only about 1/3 – 1/2 done. Basically I stop when my neck and right hand are cramped from sitting in one position for too long.

But I persevere.

Find A Different Canvas

In an old post (Dec 2016), I wrote:

As writers, we are artists whose canvas is the mind of the reader; our brushes are the words we use to create the story. Some paint a broad picture while others paint a smaller, more narrow picture.”

Since I seem to be at a loss for creating something for the canvas of readers’ minds, I have picked up a brush and am creating something else, something just as good, on another kind of canvas. It is creation and creativity that are most important; those of us who write or paint or create in some way must because it is who we are and it drives us. So I have to stop knocking myself for not writing. Perhaps it’s time to step away and indulge my creativity via other channels.

If you, too, are at a loss for words with your writing, step away and create something else with a different form of art/media. At some point, the writing will call you back.

#writers #painting #VanGogh #creativity #creativejuices #livecreatively

The Rise of Yellow Journalism in the Digital Age: What Writers Can Do About It

A Bit of History

It’s ironic that what began as a feud for readership and sales between two newspaper giants in the late 19th century has become commonplace practice for reporting so-called “news” on social media. Hard to believe it all began with Joseph Pulitzer (for whom the most prestigious award in Journalism is named, ironically), who purchased the New York World in 1883. Pulitzer used a sensational style of reporting for his stories and crusades against political corruption and social injustice to win the largest newspaper circulation in the U.S.

Along came William Randolph Hearst in 1895, who purchased a rival newspaper, the Journal. Hearst’s determination to be number one led him to outdoing all his competitors, including Pulitzer’s New York World,  in sensationalism, crusades, and Sunday features. Hearst stole a cartoonist from Pulitzer, which created a rival picture series that drew so much attention that the term yellow journalism was born.

Yellow journalism and the yellow press are American terms for journalism and associated newspapers that present little or no legitimate, well-researched news while instead using eye-catching headlines for increased sales.” (Wikipedia)

Yellow Journalism Lives on social media

Following the recent siege of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., prompted by both disinformation and misinformation peppered with a deluge of yellow journalism news bytes all over the Internet, I couldn’t help but notice how readily many had accepted what they read on social media sites. TMI, or ‘too much information’  – or more aptly – disinformation, prompted such an outburst as to endanger the lives of people and our political system at its core.

“Fight it but don’t ignore it, show it for what it really is: a pathetic attempt to manipulate the truth for the sake of ratings, attention, or personal and political agendas.”

As writers, reporters, and journalists, there is an obligation to maintain the integrity of our words. In a previous post, I cautioned writers and speakers to use words carefully as they have the capacity for great power. In that post, I also wrote: “Write from the compassionate heart, support a peaceful co-existence and community goals, stand your ground without being divisive.” This phrase rings more true now as we face a pandemic, interference with our voting rights/system, and an incoming/new Administration, all susceptible to SM disinformation.

end yellow journalism!

The sheer volume of the 24/7 news cycle is overwhelming. At what point do we say ENOUGH? Are we even able to filter it all? (Of course not.) Or must we choose to step away from the constant download of so much disinformation? Is it possible to discern the true news from the false?

Yellow journalism must not, can not, should not, replace words written with integrity. Fight it but don’t ignore it, show it for what it really is: a pathetic attempt to manipulate the truth for the sake of ratings, attention, or personal and political agendas.

Pledge to maintain the integrity of your words. Promise to use your power wisely. Stop yellow journalism in its tracks.

#journalism #writers #yellowjournalism #politics #tellthetruth #twitter #instagram #democracy #fakenews #stopyellowjournalism #writewithintegrity

Coming Full Circle

Home1

Source: Pixabay

In a scene from the movie Forrest Gump, there’s a famous line Forrest says after he stops running:

Finally, Some Good News for CA Freelancers!

Thumbs Up California!

On September 4th, Governor Gavin Newsom of California signed a bill modifying the new independent contractor law that went into effect last year. This is HUGE. The new Independent Contractor law meant freelance writers here in California could no longer earn a living beyond our state border. In two previous posts, I outlined the new law, its definition and how it might affect writers. The new, modified law, which is effective immediately, includes “freelance writers, musicians, film support crews and visual artists, who now can continue working as independent contractors.1

Blog post #1: New CA Labor Law

Blog post #2: Writers Losing Contracts

Restrictions Gone

Gov Newsom also removed the restriction of accepting no more than thirty-five (35) freelance assignments from one outlet. As of Monday night, freelance writers and other content creators are EXEMPT! The bill, previously introduced as AB5, is now AB2257 and has these features:

  1. It eliminates the cap of 35 submissions for freelance writers. Yippee!
  2. Included in this new exemption of “professional services” are translators, appraisers, and (this is a unique one) registered foresters.
  3. Industry workers, including recording artists, songwriters, producers and promoters are also now exempt.

This update of a law that clearly affected writers’ ability to earn a living, especially during COVID, is a ray of light bursting through dark days. Will other states with similar laws follow suit?

1.Source: https://deadline.com/2020/09/governor-gavin-newsom-signs-ab-2557-helping-independent-contractors-1234571287/

It’s Happening Elsewhere, Too

So do other states use what is called the ABC test? This from an article on Forbes.com: “Massachusetts and New Jersey already use the ABC Test to restrict the number of workers classified as independent contractors. Other states use the ABC Test for specific situations, such as determining unemployment compensation.”

From a legal website: “Some of the states where their legislatures have adopted the ABC test include California (recent change), Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia.”

Whether this change to the new law is a good thing (and I believe it is), there are still plenty of kinks to be worked out. In the meantime, writers, keep on writing. Let’s be a force for change that benefits all. Gig economies are here to stay (thanks, millenials).

So are freelancers.

#freelancers #freelancewriters #writersofcalifornia #independentcontractor #gigeconomy #Uber #Lyft #fictionwriters #nonfictionwriters #investigativejournalism

Words Have Power So Be Careful How You Use Them

The Power of Our Words

Maelstrom, acrylic, 2018 ©DThunderhawk

Writers have long known that words have power. Socrates, Shakespeare, Lao Tzu, Jesus, and many others (including Hitler) across the span of humanity have changed lives and moved civilizations to follow a particular premise. We find ourselves, once again, in dynamic and chaotic times. The ebb and flow of human existence has always been based on the power of words.
Words, whether written or oral, have the power to change, heal, hurt, destroy and/or create. As writers in this changing global landscape, we must be more vigilant in choosing our words. What and whom are we trying to effect? Writers and orators can be leaders of change for better or worse, it’s our choice.

Phrases like Black Lives Matter and Civil Rights Movement and words like racism and colonialism, these are powerful words that awaken us, call us out to be better, or remind us that we still have a ways to go.

This Is Personal

Example: A friend is in a challenging situation at the moment. Forced out of her rental (not an eviction but a notice to vacate) during Covid times, she sleeps in her car because there’s a huge housing shortage where she lives. Her hypnotherapist made a comment during a session that has stuck with her and has helped her better deal with the current situation.
He said:

“It’s not WHO you are, it’s your circumstance.”

Bam. Light bulb. 💡
Aha moment, for sure, even for me.

This, Too, Shall Pass

When she heard that, she said it gave her a whole new outlook. She no longer feels it’s her fault, that sometimes bad things happen to good people and that this too, shall pass. Words chosen carefully can help us move beyond even the most difficult of challenges.
This virus is affecting us personally and globally, some more than others. It’s imperative we choose our words more carefully to ensure our survival and recovery. Write from the compassionate heart, support a peaceful co-existence and community goals, stand your ground without being divisive. Make your words work for you, not against you – or others.

Universal Energies At Work

What’s happening now, all the chaos, is Yang (movement, momentum, anger, anguish, change in process) and what will follow, accordingly, is Yin (peace, stillness, changes completed, new way of life). Universal laws are playing out before our eyes. Patience is required to get to the next phase of this seemingly never-ending cycle.
As writers, let’s use our words, our stories, as a beacon during these dark and chaotic days. Let’s create and maintain the POWER OF WORDS.

Fall Into Your Writing

 

autumn2

Source: Google Images/ townandcountrymag.com

T’is the Season

Last week came the first tease, the first hint that autumn was on its way. I love the word autumn more than fall; to me, it connotes a subtle changing of the guards, so to speak; that those hot summer days are mostly behind us and crispy, breezy, sweet-smelling days lay ahead. We even had to wear jackets for a few days last week, with the morning and evening temps getting pretty low. Some leaves have already begun to change, thanks to those cooler-than-usual nights. I can’t yet smell autumn in the air as the warmer summer weather is upon us once again. Autumn officially arrived yesterday and I wait with baited breath for the scent of those brilliant autumn colors.

Days become shorter this time of year and an indoor activity like writing (plus the PR and marketing) is a great way to stay busy without burning up too much energy. I love to write later in the evening, from around 9pm to 1am, this time of year; it seems everyone gets home and settles in earlier than usual so my corner of the world goes a bit quieter. Does yours?

Ready for the Holidays?

This is also a good time of year to gear up your PR and marketing for the holidays. I’ve published a nutrition book, so it’s a good time of year to get on an anthology list for holiday purchases to help people eat better during and after the holiday binges.

Alli – Alliance of Indpendent Authors – has some great tips for DIY PR for us Indie authors in a post written by Helen Baggott. She posts some sensible advice on pre- and post-publication PR (even though she’s in Great Britain, I’m sure much of this applies here in the U.S. as well). Try contacting magazines related to your book’s topic (hers was genealogy and hand-written postcards); check out trade journals as well, as they are often a good source for some free (or affordable) advertising/PR.

If you utilize Ingram Spark, it’s a good time to check whether your book is getting into libraries (locally and nationwide).  She recommends contacting Resource Managers at the library’s headquarters (or main branch here in the states). Have a 60-second pitch ready in case they don’t yet have your book on their shelves. Another option (which is a bit more costly) is to donate some of your books to your local branches. I did that with my first book and it turned out to be pretty popular, especially with high school kids doing book reports.

Hemingway – A Funky New App

And if you haven’t tried it yet, check out the Hemingway app. Dr. Judith Briles, The Book Shephard, highly recommends it as a way to ferret out bad verbiage, grammar issues, etc. It’s free and easy to use and it provides you with a readability index, meaning at what grade level you’re writing. She suggests hovering around a sixth grade level; sadly, this is the average literacy level in the U.S.  There are color-coded phrases that pop up and suggest fixes.

When I popped in the first chapter of my in-the-works novel, it came up with good readability … but at a grade 3 level. Sigh. Evidently I used a few too many adverbs but only three of the sentences were judged as hard to read (by who, I wonder, if I’m writing at a 3rd grade level). I think I will spend some more time with this app to see where I can improve my writing and the story. I’d even like to get a little above grade 6, in the hopes that some readers are more literate than that.

As I said, now is the time to ‘fall’ into your writing. NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, so sharpen your editing pencils, your writing mindset and get your desk in order – it’s time to write!

Beating the Heat, Posting Book Ads & The Dark Side of Writing

Source: Google Images

The Heat Is On

OMG…summer is definitely HERE. Mid-90s to high 90s, then on up to triple digits (108 the other day), then back down to 90-ish today. No better time to catch up on some summer reading (indoors where the A/C is, of course). I’m currently digging into a Steve Berry spy novel and just finished devouring the latest in Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch series (one of my all-time faves). Summer reading is a nice respite from both work (if you have a day job) and writing. The heat can sometimes ‘gunk up the works,’ leaving imaginations stalled. Summertime reading can reignite that engine. So pick up a few good books at your local library or bookstore, grab a large lemonade with ice, a nice lawn chair, and you’re good to go.

What are you reading right now? Some people like to save certain books for summer reading – are you one of those? I’d love to hear what titles people are reading; who knows, you might hook me on one of your fave authors.

Posting On Book Ad Sites – Are They Worth It?

I got this idea from an email newsletter I subscribe to and decided to check out the four options they listed. You know how you ‘just know’ when a website, due to its layout style (too busy, not busy enough, asymmetrical, etc.) turns you off? That’s how I felt when I visited the some of the sites. Nothing impressive and they seemed already full of a lot of books I’ve not heard of – then again, I’m not exactly worldly when it comes to global writers and authors. They just didn’t feel right to me. Suggestions on some good sites for posting book ads are welcome.

Bookswifi.com and creativedesignwriters.com are two paid sites that seem decent enough. Books Wifi offers four options: Premium, Featured, Standard, and Basic and the prices are reasonable. How many hits you’ll get on your book, I have no idea. You can decide whether it’s a worthy expense.

Source: bookswifi.com

Creative Design Writers (.com) is definitely international; there are classifieds, company ads (realty) and fan pages (do people really look at these?); one even reads like a resume/dating site ad. There are ads in other languages, too. Something for everyone, I suppose.

Source: creativedesignerswriters.com

Also offered are SM marketing ($100 USD/month) and SEO ($150 USD/month) but I prefer to work with people I know and who live in my area. Not sure how safe some of these international sites are or who’s running them.

The Dark Side of Writing

A good place to learn about the shadowy world of writing is Writer Beware®, a brilliant website where writing and literary scams are tracked by a team of writers. The current article is on vanity publishers – you know, the companies that make you pay up front for marketing, printing, and other expenditures, only to not receive royalty payments, inaccurate accounting of sales, refusal to print more books, etc. The complaints have been rolling in on these vanity publishers and you should do your due diligence in checking out the site on a regular basis. This is one of the recent articles on vanity publishers that is a MUST-READ:

https://accrispin.blogspot.com/2019/07/from-writer-bewares-files-seven-most.html

Once upon a time, back in the early days of self-publishing, I almost fell for a vanity publisher called Tate Publishing (a Christian-based company, which I was unaware of until I read the heavy Christian verbiage in the publishing contract and changed my mind), now touting itself as Christian Faith Publishing , and is connected to another vanity publisher, Page Publishing. Lots of five-star BBB ratings to go with the numerous complaints, but the good does not outweigh the bad in these cases.

Basically, these vanity publishers take your money because that’s how they make theirs. They don’t follow through on their promises of sales, royalties and book exposure. If you’re new to self-publishing, DO YOUR RESEARCH and AVOID VANITY PUBLISHERS. These days, it’s fairly easy to get your book out there as long as you spend some money on a professional editor, book layout, and book cover design.

“The secret of these vanities is that they present themselves as publishers. Their target customer doesn’t want to self-publish…what they see is the validation of being chosen by a publisher, and because they don’t realize that reputable publishers don’t charge fees, they are vulnerable to this kind of deceptive advertising.” Victoria Strauss, Writer Beware®

Summer is a busy time for writers, readers, and booksellers. Take the time to enjoy a good read and don’t fall for literary predators!

 

Freelancing Part 3: Would This Work For You?

20 ways to freelance-elna cain

Source: elnacain.com

Here are the final 3 lessons on finding freelance work, especially if you’re a beginner. I was skeptical to begin with (I tend toward cynicism naturally) and wasn’t all that impressed with what she offered. Not that she doesn’t offer quality information or lessons. It’s just that I can find what she’s offering all over the Internet so her services/products aren’t unique. Honestly, once I finished perusing her 6-day lesson, I got the impression that she moved quickly from freelance writing to selling her ‘secret to success.’

Lesson 4It’s all about you.

Again, Elna touches on something that many bloggers and writers before her have discussed – the lack of confidence in your ability to earn money by writing for other people. The DOUBT and FEAR that people have about getting themselves out there, that they don’t really have something to offer. Heard it before but I agree it’s an important aspect to face and move beyond in order to succeed.

Lesson 5Time to source freelance jobs and apply for them.

Assuming you’ve worked out the doubts and fears, she emphasizes the best way (actually, I think it’s the only way, in the beginning) is to start applying for freelance gigs on various sites. A no-brainer; how else might you find work? Once again, she inserts her call to action in the middle of the narrative (the hook). Good advice re free job boards and she lists some sites to visit. Then she offers another 53 sites by clicking on a link to a page on her website that is chock full of information. Overall, some useful information for beginners here.

Lesson 6Step up to pitch.

In this final free lesson, she details successful pitching habits, including her “proven five-step pitching formula”:

  1. Pitch often – make a goal to send 10 pitches a week, or if you’re super competitive, try sending 10 pitches every day before 10 a.m.
  2. Cast a wide net – pitch to any job ad that you’re somewhat qualified for. In the beginning, you’ll have more success if you’re not too picky.
  3. Pitch in the morning or on the day the ad is published. Heard the saying, the early bird catches the worm? Well, the early freelance writer catches all the gigs.
  4. Do some research about the company or startup. Many job ads tell you the name of the company so run a Google search to check them out. This can prove to be helpful when pitching.
  5. Include a name in your pitch – make it more personable by finding out the name associated with the job ad. This can be tricky but looking at their company website is a start.

She closes with some good advice on how to write that pitch letter.

All in all, the information in the last three segments is useful, including the 53 sites for finding freelance work. I like the details on building a pitch letter. And, of course, she closes with another call to action to sign up for her class and ends with an offer for a “special exclusive lesson + gift for you!

Take away the sales pitches and you’ll find a few good pointers.

Will I sign up for her class?

No.

Will I continue to subscribe to her website?

No.

Does she offer anything NEW that isn’t already out there on the web?

No.

That’s my pitch to you. Take from it what you will.