All That Jitters

Fear Emotion5 clipart MS Office

In this current, and hopefully soon-to-be post-COVID atmosphere, anxiety and fear have ruled many lives around the globe. With good reason. Anxiety and fear about people’s health, futures, finances, etc. are keeping many people up at night and jittery during the day. While anxiety is a normal human emotion, it becomes pathological when it interferes with our daily lives in such a way that is considered beyond the norm. Which begs the question: how does one cope?

With Chinese medicine.

You Have Options

Acupuncture has repeatedly proven its ability to mitigate and dissipate the emotional and spiritual (seen as inseparable in CM) imbalances brought on by just this type of global disaster. In CM, these imbalances are understood to affect one’s shen, or consciousness/spirit. Emotional imbalances affect organ function as well. Chinese herbs, as posted in a previous blog, are a time-tested option for reducing anxiety and associated symptoms like insomnia, rumination and nervousness, without the side effects that often accompany pharmaceuticals.

In his article Anxiety: The Unsettled Shen, Mark W. Frost, L.Ac., writes:

According to TCM theory, the emotions of fear, pensiveness, grief and anger cause the Qi to sink, stagnate, dissipate, and rise respectively.

The Seven Emotions

In CM, the Seven Emotions are: joy (Heart), anger (Liver), pensiveness/over-thinking (Spleen), grief (Lung), fear/shock (Kidney). The emotions that combine to create anxiety are fear (of the unknown, loss, for one’s security/safety), pensiveness (rumination), grief (sadness, loss), and anger/resentment (loss of control over one’s situation).

Let’s look at these in a bit more detail:

Anger is the emotion controlled by Liver in CM. Liver controls the flow of Qi throughout the body. Anger constricts that movement as does rage, resentment, frustration and bitterness. Chronic constraint (stagnation) of Qi creates Heat internally, which agitates shen/Heart (Liver nourishes Heart in the Five Element system) and fails to anchor shen within the Heart. This can result in disorders of psyche and soma.

The opposite of joy (Heart) is sadness. Sadness, while a normal emotional response to loss can, when extreme or protracted (over longer periods of time), stagnate Heart and Lung Qi, which leads to a Fire deficiency (this can affect overall or various components of bodily functions).

Pensiveness (aka over-thinking/rumination) leads to both stagnation and deficiency, setting up a chronic imbalance in digestive functions (in CM, Spleen controls digestion). This stagnation (excess) and deficiency (reduction in function) bring about the formation of Dampness (wet mucus) and Phlegm (dry mucus), and combine with Heat. Combined with constraint and anxiety, it can manifest as “knots in the stomach” or “butterflies in the stomach.” Depending on the individual, digestion and elimination can be seriously increased (seen with anxiety) or decreased (seen with depression as it causes constraint).

Grief is the emotion associated with Lung in CM. It is similar to sadness in that a prolonged state of grief will cause constraint in the Lung/Heart relationship and likely lead to a deficiency.

Fear is the emotion associated with Kidney in CM. While fear is healthy and keeps us from doing foolish things, it, too, can become protracted as a result of fright/shock (think PTSD and other anxiety disorders). 

When there is an imbalance, fear can foster a general insecurity about life. A deficiency of the Yin aspect of the Water element, the calming, receptive and grounding portion, can manifest as agitation, insecurity, and anxiety (combination of nervousness and fear). (The 5-Element Guide to Healing with Whole Foods, D. Thunderhawk, L.Ac., 2016.)

In Conclusion…

This has been a nerve-wracking experience for many around the globe. Meditation, solitude (easy with the shelter-in-place orders), compassion, in conjunction with holistic healing methods (acupuncture, herbs, Reiki, medical Qi Gong, healing hands, etc.), can ground us and reduce, even heal, our anxiety, our jitters. We must continue to move forward no matter what tomorrow may bring. Remember that adversity makes us stronger.

May you find peace and strength to ease your minds and nourish your spirit. Namaste.

 

 

 

Like, Um, Well, You Know…Seriously, To Be Fair…

crutch words1
Source: Google Images

Grammar Still Rules

Grammar rules still apply to your writing and speaking and always will. Especially if you want to keep readers and listeners engaged.

Today I’m writing about a few of my pet peeves that have become far too prevalent in today’s writing and speaking. I’m talking about crutch words and fillers: like, well, you know, ah, um, uh, etc. 

My biggest issue with these overused words and space fillers is that they make the writer/speaker sound less intelligent, less able to think or speak quickly or clearly. Which equates to poor writing and speaking skills. And poor communication skills take away one’s credibility, which means people won’t read your books or listen to what you say. Is this how you want the world of readers and listeners to perceive you? 

Ditch the Crutches

While some crutch words and fillers are acceptable in written dialogue, they should be left out of interviews and other professional conversations. If you listen to podcasts, you know what I’m talking about; fillers and crutches take up way more space in a conversation. Listen to an interview, maybe even record it to your computer. Then edit out the fillers and crutches and listen to what remains – the actual conversation sounds quite different when it’s cleaned up. It’s more direct and to the point and it’s the same with writing. Remove the fillers and crutches (except when necessary in character dialogue) and you’ll find the reading succinct and clear. And credible.

A Interesting Peeve

Another of my pet peeves of late is the incorrect use of ‘a’ and ‘an.’ Far too often, even on the evening national news, I hear professionals using ‘a’ where ‘an’ is required.

Here’s the rule: if the word begins with a vowel or a consonant with a vowel sound like the h in hour or in abbreviations/acronyms such as MBA, use an. If the word begins with a consonant or consonant sound as in book or PTA, use a. I’m annoyed every time I hear phrases like “a airplane” or “a interested party” because the speakers come off as not very bright or particularly attentive to their grammar. Or they have lazy copyeditors!

Modify This

The next peeve on my list (which I swear grows with age) is the overuse and incorrect use of what are called vague modifiers. Vague modifiers are also crutch words and fillers and don’t belong in good writing or clear speeches: A lot, kind of, perhaps, truly, somewhat, quite, seemingly, suddenly, rather, fairly, etc.. There are more, but you get the idea. How often do you use these in your writing/speaking? Are you even conscious of whether you use these or not? Here is a link to a funny article on crutch words that “literally” made me laugh out loud.

I’ll admit I’m guilty of falling prey to the occasional crutch and filler. However, I have become more conscious of my spoken words as a result of doing a podcast last year. That, in turn, has made me more aware of written words and their impact.

Those Catholic grammar school nuns beat good English grammar into me and my classmates – quite literally, actually. To this day, I can’t finish a project and ‘turn it in’ (publish) unless it’s perfect.

Seriously. 😉

#grammarrules #thewritinglife #communicationskills #writeagoodstory #podcasting #Englishgrammar

Finding Peace in Chaos

Yin Yang with Light3 (3)

Universal Law

The Law of Unity of Opposites (theory of Yin and Yang) states that nothing in the Universe is totally Yin or totally Yang. Yin and Yang are in opposition and are interdependent – each is necessary for the other’s existence (The 5-Element Guide to Healing with Whole Foods, 2016). In our current situation, it’s necessary to find the Yin/peace within the Yang/chaos. With external avenues closed to so many (e.g., fitness centers, yoga and tai chi classes, meditations, etc.), going inward is our only salvation if we’re to survive this viral onslaught.

Finding Your Peace

All over Instagram (and other SM sites), people are gathering together in solidarity (and solitude) to find that peace. Meditation and other spiritual services are readily available online to help us maintain equilibrium. Another road inward is writing: expressing those emotions, telling those stories, that must be felt and heard. Out of chaos (erratic) comes peace (consistency), it’s the natural order of things. People all over the world are finding ways to cope and, hopefully, to survive.

The TCM View

Naturally, I can’t help but think how many will be affected so deeply that physical health becomes an issue at some point. Traditional Chinese medicine practitioners know that emotional distress can contribute to the development of disease (imbalances). Learning to control emotions is a major step in preventing these imbalances. The Huang Di Nei Jing, also known as The Yellow Emperor’s Classic, the bible of TCM medicine, recognized that emotional and psychological factors are important causes of illness. The Nei Jing indicated that excessive emotions impair the internal organs of the human body: Anger hurts the liver, joy hurts the heart, brooding hurts the spleen, and melancholy hurts the lungsHence, the Nei Jing proposes regulating the emotions by keeping the heart calm and cheerful and the mind free of worries:

“Do not be weighed down by perplexing thoughts; strive to be calm and optimistic; be complacent; keep sound in body and mind.” 

Let It Out

In other words, get writing! Use your writing as a catharsis, if you will, to free yourself of pent up stress and emotions brought on by this viral pandemic.

After my mother died I wrote my first book, a creative nonfiction, in four and a half months. Tears and words poured out of me and by the time I was done writing the book, I was pretty much done grieving her death. Use this downtime wisely; don’t squander the opportunity to find your peace in the chaos, no matter what it is.

#coronavirus #findpeaceinchaos #Chinesemedicine #writing #storyteller #yinyang #meditation #yoga #acupressure #acupuncture #fictionwriters #

Below is a chart you can follow for applying acupressure to various points if you’re feeling stressed/depressed (please share it with as many people as possible):

Acupressure for Depression

Source: Acupuncture Media Works

Stuck At Home? Make Lemonade From Those Lemons!

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Source: Pixabay

Lots of folks stuck at home right now, including writers. That may be a good thing – for writers, anyway. Sheltering-in-place is providing us all with much needed down time and an opportunity for writers to catch up on writing projects. Some folks might think it rude to market one’s book during such a serious time. I say business is business and this outbreak will eventually subside (hopefully sooner rather than later) but your business won’t. A lapse in marketing now can have negative effects later on. 

Marketing Your Book During a Crisis

Sure, some people are home because they’re sick, but many are home as a preventive. And with the Internet, we can maintain connections with loved ones as well as fans/readers. It’s a great time to reach out to others, whether for a well-check or for marketing your book/s. Use this down time as an opportunity to reach out to people but haven’t had the time. Cuz now you do.

Acknowledge But Don’t Apologize

Don’t apologize for continuing to put your book out there in front of potential readers. Sure, you can acknowledge the current atmosphere. Maybe your book is relevant to this viral outbreak: science/clinical; nutrition; ways to stay safe in a crisis (i.e., how to put together Go Bag), etc. Here are a few suggestions from an article at booklaunch.com on how to tie your book/marketing into what’s going on:

  1. Start a social distancing book club with people (that includes your book). You can have daily/weekly meetings on Zoom or Skype to discuss. This will give isolated people a way to connect.
  2. Run a “boredom promotion” where people can get your books at a discount.
  3. Partner with other authors to promote a box set of all of your books.

I’m running a ‘stuck at home’ deep discount for readers who want to shop smarter in the grocery aisles. Personally, I like the idea of a ‘boredom promotion’; takes their focus off the negative and puts it on something positive. You’re helping people through your book.

Something New

This is also a great time to start a new marketing angle like podcasting. You can host your own show or be a guest on another podcast. Check out radioguestlist.com if you need guests to interview or wish to be interviewed. Great way to get the word out on you and your book and it won’t cost you a dime.

Yeah, we’re all cooped up in our homes but there are ways to invite the world in so it doesn’t feel so lonely. Remember the old saying: “when life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” 

Shelter-in-Place Discount

MB nutrition book-card

 

Please share this with friends, family, and others who may benefit from nourishment…

Because so many of you are sheltering in place, here’s a way to help you get & stay healthy through these troubled times. For a short time (at least until end of March, perhaps to mid-April), I’m offering my nutrition book at a DEEP DISCOUNT (40% OFF!).

Because my book is printed with Lulu Press, there should be little to no delays in the shipping process (unless otherwise noted by Lulu Press). Please, let me know otherwise.

Staying in gives us more time to read, learn how to cook, write more articles, etc. Use this down time as an opportunity to strengthen your and your family’s immune system/s. Eat more fresh food (if you can find it; our grocery stores are doing a fab job in keeping produce stocked), and less boxed food. Use more spices/herbs to help flavor packaged foods. If you can, cook outside on the grill and get some fresh air.

Understandably, in a situation like this, we MUST do with what we have. So be flexible. Be willing to learn how to do something differently. Understand your options and do what you must without inconveniencing others.

Remember, we’re all in this together.

Are All Your Eggs in One (Amazon) Basket?

eggs in basket2

Source: Google Images

New Priorities

In case you don’t already know, Publishers Weekly sent an email titled “Amazon Deprioritizes Book Sales Amid Coronavirus Crisis.” Amazon is working diligently to prioritize “the surge in demand for household staples, medical supplies, and other high demand products.” Publishers (self and otherwise) are one of the suppliers whose goods (meaning books) will receive a low priority in shipping until at least April 5th. This makes sense; a good decision on their part, I believe.

So if you have your books self-published only through Amazon, this will pose a problem of lost or delayed sales. Hopefully you have listed your books (eBooks and hard copies) with other publishing sites like Lulu, Smashwords, Ingram, and the like. Because my book is published via Lulu Press and distributed to Amazon (and other retail sites), readers can still access my book here. Not a good idea to have your works all at one location, not at anytime but certainly not in this current climate.

Amazon is aware of the negative trickle-down effect of this decision and is working diligently to add 100K new positions in fulfillment centers across the U.S. The good news is that many of those folks out of work (restaurant servers, retail jobs, etc.) will have an opportunity to earn instead of falling into financial ruin or bankruptcy while waiting for businesses to reopen.

Plenty of Options

Which is why I’m glad I’m with Lulu Press. So far, I don’t see any announcements on their site re shipment issues. Not yet, anyway. But I’ll keep watching. 

In times such as this, it’s best not to put all your eggs in one publishing basket. While sales may droop overall, it’s not the end of the world (despite what some preppers may believe). There are plenty of self-publishing sites to list your work on; make a list of which ones would best benefit your genre/s. Widen your net, keep your options open. Put a few eggs in many different baskets.  

The Viral Effect

Chinese herbs

A Shift in Focus

Okay, so this is going to be one of those occasional, off-topic blog posts I mentioned in my previous post. You know, the one where I discuss something other than writing.

Coronavirus, aka COVID-19, is making its way around the globe. In the wake of this pandemic (per the CDC), irrational fears about this virus are just as prevalent. So I wanted to take this opportunity to help ‘clear the air’ on some fears that have gone ‘viral’, especially regarding certain items coming from China – Chinese herbal medicines.

A Long History

Chinese herbs are the most studied herbs on the planet. There exists over 2500 years of empirical evidence (patient-centered treatments and responses) and Western evidence-based trials, though inherently flawed, are increasingly showing the efficacy of many herbs in our pharmacopoeia. Outbreaks of SARS and H1N1 were successfully treated with herbs in some Chinese/TCM hospitals. Chapter 2 of a popular medical text (that got me through four years of herb classes and clinics), Chinese Medical Herbology and Pharmacology (Chen, 2001), is Heat-Clearing and Toxin-Eliminating Herbs. Subsections of this chapter contain many herbs that have either antiviral or antibacterial properties, or both. Several have been tested and show effects stronger than some pharmaceuticals (and without side effects).

There is an irrational fear that anything coming out of China, especially medicinal herbs, is contaminated with the virus. Let me clarify: 1) these herbs must pass muster at customs when arriving in the U.S.; 2) once they arrive at either a manufacturing facility or a large retail operation (in both cases, Kamwo Herbs, located in NYC’s Chinatown, and one of my finest herb sources), the herbs go through a rigorous testing process required by the FDA. These companies are in regular contact with either the CDC and WHO to continue providing safe, efficacious medicines.

Extra Precautions

According to several emails I’ve received from some of my professional accounts, herb companies are currently taking extra precautions when it comes to testing. They’re also reassuring customers that there are no health concerns at this time for the transmission of COVID-19 on packaged goods (traveling far, changes in temperature, etc.). Even the CDC advises that because of poor survivability on hard surfaces there’s a low risk of the virus spreading from packages shipped over days or weeks due to ambient temperatures. 

Seek Out a Professional

One of my concerns is people rushing to order herbs online to treat this virus without first consulting a TCM physician. Another is if you don’t know what you’re ordering or aren’t familiar with the company you’re ordering from, my recommendation is don’t do it. In school, we’re taught to look for specific certifications, such as GMP standards (Good Manufacturing Process) and other certifications. Certain companies (like MinShan) follow GMP standards, while some in China do not (and their formulas may contain questionable substances, including Western meds). It’s important to know the difference.

Also, if you’re not familiar with medicinal herbs, you may inadvertently buy herbs or a formula that is incorrect for your symptoms. This may lead to unnecessary side effects (i.e., loose bowels due to Cold nature of antiviral herbs), no effect (because they’re not the herbs you need), or an interaction (positive/potentiate or negative/inhibit) with other medicines you’re taking, whether plant-based or pharmaceutical.

If you’re interested in going the holistic/plant-based route, seek out a licensed, trained professional. Individual diagnosis is paramount to prescribing the correct herbs in the correct dosages, all in one formula. This will save you money and give you peace of mind, knowing that the herbs you’re taking are safe.

Be careful, and be well.

 

 

Expert Advice

expert advice

Source: Google Images/amazon.com

Listen to The Expert

My professional Inbox contained an interesting article this morning from The Book Designer blog. Written by author and former marketing consultant Brandon Cornett, his article made some good points. While I’ve read most of his how-to advice in other articles, one in particular stuck with me:

“Blog about your genre or niche. If you want to attract the kinds of readers who will buy your books, you should be blogging about those topics.”

Hmmm….

When I started this blog, I figured the focus had to be on writing (genre, research, editing, books, etc.), from an author’s perspective. It didn’t occur to me that I could write posts on a topic in my expertise (which is not necessarily writing). For example, posts regarding my nonfiction book on Chinese nutrition therapy, which I have reserved for my professional FB page (that I’ve ignored much in the past two years). I feel Mestengo Books is not the place to post alternative medicine articles but I certainly can provide some information on where Chinese nutrition therapy is now and where it’s going in the future. After all, I’m an expert (of sorts), right?

“In either scenario, fiction or nonfiction, you’re basically funneling your passion and knowledge into website content that will attract like-minded readers.” 

“But the bulk of your posts should be related to the genre or topic you write about. This will help you boost your book sales over time.” – Brandon Cornett

Some “Experts” are Clueless

In another article, author Anne R. Allen, a satirical writer, posted a vent about “clueless advice givers” – you know, the folks who think they’re experts but aren’t – and who talk like they know when they don’t (and scoff at you when you try to clue them in) . This has always been one of my pet peeves (I’m up against it far too often in any discussion about herbal medicines). I refer to those people as “armchair experts.” It’s a lack of knowledge in a particular area (but a desire to have that knowledge) combined with ignorance, giving the person a false sense of power. There’s actually a name for this: The Dunning-Kruger Effect (1999). (You can look it up but I think it’s ironic that it took so long for two college kids to name a behavior that’s been around for as long as we humans have, probably.)

How Do Others See You?

My business coach routinely refers to me as an expert (in Chinese medicine) though I am hesitant to wear that moniker. A point in my favor is that I have climbed that mountain (five years of didactic and clinical training plus years of clinical work) to reach the top, to become the expert. Many folks dream about being at the top of the mountain without having to first climb, an obviously impossible feat (and looks spectacularly similar to that Dunning-Kruger Effect).

So now I’m thinking about posting an article from time to time that has more to do with nutrition therapy itself and/or the writing of a nonfiction book. Maybe I can write about the research process and how to put it together in a chapter or book. Brandon’s expert advice on blogging about my genre or niche opened my eyes.

Every now and then, everyone needs an expert to do just that.

Fun with Fonts: How Readable is Your Book?

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Source: Google Images/wpstic.com

An Eye for Fonts?

I admit I know little about fonts in the technical sense. As a creative, I’ve always chosen fonts for their look and feel. It’s why I chose the font Candara for my nutrition book. It’s a serif font with delicate strokes reminiscent of an Asian font, which made sense to me since the book is about Chinese nutrition therapy.

But I did notice after publishing the book (and re-reading it for errors) that Candara, while pleasant to read, is not as crisp on the page as I would like. I thought perhaps it was the printing process, that the quality wasn’t there. Not true. I’ve had other books printed with different fonts by the same company and I didn’t ‘see’ a font issue. Looking at other documents where I’ve used Candara, I now understand it was not the best choice, leaving me to wonder how it affects a customer’s reading (and retention).

Technical Readability

Do the fonts in your books offer readability? Are the letters distinguishable from each other? Do the readers’ eyes flow through the text without any visual discomfort? For me, large round letters like Arial give me an eyeball  headache when used for lengthy articles or books.

And yet I find it ironic that a good online article on fonts and readability of books is written in a pale gray Arial font on a stark white background. Talk about a hard read…

pale gray font
Source: https://www.ingramspark.com/blog/best-fonts-for-books

Serif, Not Sans is Best

According to the article, serif fonts give a book more readability. Think of those fine strokes at the end of each letter. That’s a serif font. Serif fonts pull words together, making them easier to read (and less likely to cause eyeball headache or lost interest in what you’re reading). Sans serif fonts like Arial are more difficult to read in body text so reserve them for headings and titles (see example above).

The font you choose can also send a message to the reader; hence, my choice of Candara for an Asian-themed book. Editors will read a manuscript and decide the best font for both look and feel. Again, because it’s something I always looked at from an artistic perspective, I never considered the technical side. Just another of many lessons learned in the self-publishing process.

How To Choose?

So how do you decide which fonts to use if you’re a self-publisher? Do the research. A good place to start is The Book Designer website. Joel Friedman has been designing books and working with typesetting for decades. His website offers much useful information and some free downloads, too. If you have a good editor, ask for font recommendations. Play with different serif fonts, see how it makes the story feel as you read it. You can even print sections in different serif fonts and have family or friends read the passages and report back on the readability.

In the Ingram Spark article, these were the top serif fonts for books: 

  1. Caslon – preferred by book designers
  2. Garamond – originated in France; a popular font for books
  3. Jenson – designed for Adobe systems
  4. Minion – designed for Adobe systems
  5. Palatino – originally intended for headings and smaller sections, it was later tweaked for use in book texts

The Sky’s the Limit… Sort Of

For chapter titles, book designers generally advise staying away from over-used  fonts like Comic Sans or Papyrus; decorative fonts like script fonts are best avoided as well. In my first fiction novel, I was feeling adventurous (especially since I was writing an adventure novel) and used an unusual font called Yanks Hand for the chapter titles. Gave the book a slightly quirky look and feel, which worked with the unique genre/story line (Native American spirits/religion).

But what do you do if you don’t have/use Adobe systems? Well, for starters you can go to the website MyFonts.com to test fonts before purchasing them. Once you find a font you like, make sure to purchase the entire family of that font (regular, bold, italic, etc.). In Adobe systems, each version of a font is unique and if you don’t purchase the whole family, you won’t legally be able to use italics, for example, if you didn’t buy it.

Remember, what’s most important is your book’s readability. Get that right from the beginning and your readers will ‘see’ your story in a better light. And font!

P.S. I’m trying new fonts on my blogs. This one is Libre Baskerville. I found the last serif too small. Might go back to the sans serif, Alegreya Sans. Do you find this new font more readable? Less?

Are You a Copycat or Trailblazer?

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Source: pixabay.com

Which One Are You?

The topic for this blog hit me as I perused the same ol’ same ol’ of “how to” articles/posts: how to make an infographic for your website, how to not suck at marketing, how to earn more with CPC (click to pay ads) on FB or Amazon, etc. There’s a proliferation of knowledgeable (and not-so-much-so) bloggers and authors out there in digital space eager to share what they’ve learned from their successes and mistakes.

But at what point can I/you turn away from all the “do-this-if-you-want-this-result” advice and blaze my/your own trail in the world of writing/self-publishing? Looking back over the last thirteen years (I self-published my first book in ’07), I have learned more on my own.

Considering that one of my books (published in ’16) still sells monthly, I’d say that makes me a trailblazer

In reading some of these articles/posts, it struck me that one writer’s path to success is not necessarily another’s. Just because Joe Author found a way to get a gazillion hits on his website and Jane Writer discovered the “secret” to successfully marketing her book doesn’t mean we have to follow in their paths (copycat).

Yet there is validity in much of the shared successes by authors online. It’s always been a good idea to learn from others’ experiences, both successes and mistakes. What’s vital is knowing when that information will benefit you and your writing business.

Good But Not How-to Advice

Take, for example, George R. R. Martin, famous for his Game of Thrones series/movies. Instead of providing a bunch of ‘how-to’s’ he offers up his personal approach to writing/telling stories. This personalizes the writing experience. Many writers can identify with what George experiences when he writes. This kind of ‘experiential’ advice seems more powerful, more useful, to me. And perhaps to you, as well.  These are some of my faves, as I can identify with what he’s talking about: 

“I end each chapter with a cliffhanger, resolution, a turn, a reveal, a new wrinkle … something that will make you want to read the next chapter of that character.”


“I want a story to take me to a place that I’ve never been to before and make it come vividly alive for me.”


“It doesn’t matter what the scene is. You can see it and you can hear it, but you’re still staring at a blank screen. That’s the nuts and bolts of writing.”


“I’ve never been a fast writer, and I’ve never been good with deadlines.”


“One of the big things that distinguishes the strongest fiction from writing that’s perhaps without depth is a real understanding of what real human beings are like.”

In the end, what it comes down to is doing what’s best for you and your stories. Follow someone else’s lead if it will bring you somewhere you need to go. Otherwise, blazing your own trail in the writing/publishing world, while it may prove daunting, will most certainly bring you to triumph albeit via a bumpier road. The bumps and bruises I gained along the way are mine and mine alone; better for me to trip up myself than for someone else to do it. That’s what makes me a trailblazer.

#GeorgeRRMartin #GameofThrones #howtobeabetterwriter #writing #storytelling #fictionwriting #marketingyourbooks #authorblog #mestengobooks 

Writers, What Do You Read?

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Source: pexels.com

It’s known in the world of writing that all good writers make time to read. Some voraciously, some in between their own works or when taking a break from their writing. Do you read in the same genre as what you write? Or do you step outside of your knowledge or comfort zone to expand your mind and imagination?

Find Your Faves

Late last year I got hooked on novels by bestselling author Daniel Silva (along with David Baldacci & Carlos Ruiz Zafón). To sum it up, he’s absolutely brilliant. Doesn’t hurt that he has a background in journalism and international relations (talk about ‘write what you know’). He writes the most powerful spy/action novels; better than any Tom Clancy novel, in my opinion (and not the least bit dry as John Le Carré). Last year, I picked up a copy of The English Girl in the “New” section of the local library; ironically, I didn’t feel strongly about the protagonist or the story line. Yet something drew me back. I read a few more of his novels and now I’m hooked. I just finished Prince of Fire and will request another of his books soon. Luckily, there are still at least a half dozen of his books to read. I also just finished the latest by Craig Johnson (famous for the former Netflix show Longmire), Land of Wolves, another can’t-put-it-down kind of book. I’m about to read (again) The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón; you simply MUST read it, as it’s unlike any book I’ve read before (and don’t forget to read the other three books in this series!).

Gaining Perspective

Reading these books are mainly for my entertainment (and escape) but somewhere along the way I began looking at them from a writer’s perspective. Then an editor’s. And back to a writer’s. This process has melded with my love of reading and helped me to better understand how to build scenes, create dialogue, and craft suspense in a way that keeps one turning the pages (compelling). I make mental notes of words I’d like to use in my writing, including some I have to look up because either I haven’t used them in a long time or I don’t know what they mean.

Yet all this reading has not affected what I write. What I mean by that is I haven’t changed style or genre simply because I enjoy reading mostly crime novels. I enjoy a variety in my reading; the same goes for my writing. Which probably explains my affinity for both fiction and nonfiction writing, even though I do not tend toward more than the very occasional nonfiction read (I think it’s because I’m reminded of much-despised homework assignments.)

Does what you read affect what or how you write? Have you thought about the relationship between the two, if there is one? Does reading for entertainment enlighten you as a storyteller? Does writing open your reading options? As writers, we can appreciate a good book – whether we’ve written it or read it. So for the sake of  good stories, let’s keep writing and reading.

Gung Hay Fat Choy!

Feng Shui Bagua Map

Happy New Year!

Yes, folks, it’s that time of year again – Chinese Lunar New Year. The post title, gung hay fat choy, is Cantonese (Mandarin: Gong xi fat cai) for “congratulations on prospering in money.” It is a popular saying you’ll hear frequently during Chinese New Year. Unlike Americans, this Chinese congratulatory greeting is not based on something already achieved but instead is a wish or hope that you will achieve what you desire, hence the congratulations in the phrase. It’s a blessing of good fortune and prosperity (it’s not always money, as many Chinese believed that enough food to eat also represented abundance in one’s life). So for the first blog of this new year of 2020, I want to revisit a post I wrote back in ’17 on making sure the energies of good fortune, abundance, and prosperity will flow not only through your life but through your writing, including  your desk/office.

Remember, Qi must flow positively for prosperity to appear.

I wrote:

“As a writer, it’s important to set the tone of one’s working space; how well you organize and arrange your home office (or wherever you write) is vital to the writing process and outcome. By making a few adjustments (some more so than others, depending on your needs), you may get to experience the shifts in energy flow that can occur relatively quickly (I’m talking within a week).”

I’m also starting 2020 in a new living space where my bedroom (and desk, since I now share a house) is in the Water/Wood bagua areas (NE/E). While my best direction for success is south (that whole wall is closet), I have to place my desk facing west (my worst direction for health or success. Ugh.). So I’ve laid out my work area as best as I can according to feng shui principles: clean, uncluttered desk top, Fire element in upper left hand corner of desk (for success and getting my name out there), a ceramic turtle in Water element. The desk is solid wood with metal trim and sturdy; this makes for a good professional place to write. 

5 Feng Shui Tips for Your Writing Space

The following tips are from http://www.fengshuiforreallife.com, by Carol Olmstead. She is a certified Feng Shui practitioner and has a successful practice, books, and website. 

This is important: “If you work from home, the first Feng Shui consideration is which room or area of your home to use. If at all possible, avoid locating your office in the kitchen, where it could symbolically interfere your health, or in the bedroom, which could interfere with your love and relationships.” Carol Olmstead, http://www.fengshuiforreallife.com.

“Here are five quick fixes you can make in your workspace to give your office a Feng Shui makeover. 
Problem #1: Your desk is in the wrong location.
Quick Fix: The most auspicious location for a desk is positioned diagonally across from the door. The worst place is with your back to the door. When you sit with your back to the entrance of a room you can’t see what’s going on behind you, making you vulnerable to being “caught off guard” by your competitors, clients, or colleagues.

Things literally and figuratively go on “behind your back.” If you can’t relocate your desk, hang a mirror in front of you or place a reflective object on your desk so you can see behind you.

Problem #2: Your desk is the wrong size.
Quick Fix: A desk that is too small for the work to be done makes you feel that your ambitions and aspirations are restricted. On the other hand, a desk that is too large makes you feel that you are not up to the challenge of the work. Choose the appropriate size work surface for the job you have to do. And make sure you have enough room to spread out, create, and expand in your career.

Problem #3: There are sharp corners pointed at you.
Quick Fix: In Feng Shui, the edges of walls pointing at you are called “poison arrows.” These sharp edges send harsh energy toward you, making you feel uncomfortable, threatened, or insecure. The best way to cure or fix this problem is to place something between you and the sharp edge to block its negative energy. Good things to use include furniture, a healthy plant, soft fabric draped over the edge of the wall, or molding. 

Problem #4: You are surrounded by overhead fluorescent lights.
Quick Fix: Fluorescent lights represent the Metal Element that can be too hard and cutting when it comes at you from overhead. Plus this kind of lighting can cause headaches, eyestrain, and a whole lot of stress. Whenever you can, turn off overhead fluorescent lights and take advantage of natural daylight, or use desk and floor lamps. If you can’t turn off overhead fluorescents, try to have them replaced with full spectrum light bulbs. These simulate daylight and make you feel more comfortable.

Problem #5: Your office is cluttered.
Quick Fix: In Feng Shui, clutter represents postponed decisions and the inability to move forward. When you have so many files and piles of papers that can’t even see your desktop, it’s hard to concentrate on your work. Clear as much as you can off your desk, then use colorful folders and wicker baskets to contain the rest of your paperwork. Here is one way to jump start your office clutter clearing — Set a timer for 10 minutes, take a large plastic bag, and thrown 27 thing into the bag – things you don’t use, don’t want, and don’t need in your office. You’ll be amazed as how much more space you have opened up in your office to allow new opportunities for success to reach you.”

Resource: http://fengshuiforreallife.com/Detailed/222.html

Here’s to a prosperous, abundant 2020 for all!

2019, Remembered

farewell 2019.2

Source: Google Images

Once again, another year has passed (happens this time every year!)…

Did you accomplish your writing goals? I didn’t. Due to both welcome and unwelcome changes (it’s called life), writing more than this blog has been put on a back burner. And I’m once again considering whether to continue working on current projects (have I been away too long?) or to consider them practice for something new. How does one decide whether to publish or keep the work hidden away, a precursor for something better? Always a work in progress, I suppose.

But I digress …

2019 was a year of changes in the writing and publishing worlds. I posted about new laws effecting freelance writers in CA (and on the horizon in other states as I write this). I blogged of the import of online safety and preparing your Digital Legacy and, more than once, I discussed a variety of self-publishing options for practiced writers and proletarians. I even waxed philosophically as the mood struck me (as it so often does these days; elder wisdom, I suppose). After much deliberation (and discussion on my blog), I left certain SM sites and I don’t miss them. I blogged on writing skills and perfecting scenes and I discussed the value of proper grammar for writers who want to be taken seriously.

In short, I covered the basics and then some. Now I have to come up with all new topics in the coming year. I welcome the challenge.

It Was A Good Year

All in all, it was a good year where writing was concerned. I was consistent with blog posts, for the most part. A few of you have taken the ride with me – thanks so much, by the way, for your online support. Some of you have had the good fortune to have your book on a bestseller list; others have completed their it-took-me-a-year-to-write-it novel. Congrats. Kudos. The new year will obviously bring some much-deserved accolades to some very deserving people.

Yet my work – and yours – is not done. A new year dawns; take it as an opportunity to renew your commitment to writing your stories, publishing them to the world and then moving on to the next one. It’s how life works. We must remain in motion, always moving forward, as idleness rusts us (and our stories) from the inside out.

~ Peace to All in the New Year ~

Update: Writers in CA Losing Contracts & Jobs to New IC Law

breaking news

Oh, man, this was all over Twitter this morning… California writers, PAY ATTENTION!

Big Job Losses

On January 1st, the new Independent Contractor law goes into effect here in CA. Originally designed to improve working conditions for contractors that were actually employees, it’s having a ripple effect in the world of content creators. According to posts by Writer Beware, California writers’ contracts will be cancelled as companies (like Vox Media) look elsewhere for their freelance work. 

See previous article on this subject

See “Vox Media Ends Work With California Freelance Writers Ahead of Gig Economy Law” at hollywoodreporter.com

See “Publishers Brace for California Labor Law Changes” at  Publishers Weekly

This is gonna put a LOT of people out of work. Maybe force them back into the labor force. Sadly, in CA right now the only plentiful jobs are in service-related industries that pay about $12-14/hr. This is not looking good. At first I thought maybe things would not go this badly once the new IC law goes into effect but I was WRONG. I never expected that freelancers in CA would lose their contracts or that companies would decide to cancel all work going forward.

CNBC reported that other media sites like Eater and Curbed are also changing their business relationships with CA freelancers, resulting in HUNDREDS of lost gigs. The big issue is the cap on writing 35 articles per year, written in the law’s language as “submissions.” What’s worse is CA freelancers won’t even be considered for company job notices like transcription and SEO writing because of the new IC law. Others are outright BLACKLISTING CA freelancers from applying. ?????!!!!!!

And that’s not all… now NY and NJ are considering similar legislation… don’t let them take away your ability to earn a living as a freelancer!

A Light on the Horizon?

A new FB group, California Freelance Writers United has banded together and met with legislators regarding a proposed amendment. If you live in CA, please join this group and stand up for your work! Let’s stand up for our bread and butter!

Writers: Let’s Be Safe and Secure in 2020

breaking news 2020 security (2)

Late fall and early winter have finally melded here in NorCal. We’ve had two very wet weeks but somewhat warm (low 60s) that has now given way to early winter weather (sunny and crispy, mid to low 50s) with some bone-chilling overnight temps (low 30s… brrrr). I’ve been battling what was likely a mild case of food poisoning (it didn’t feel mild when I was in the midst of heaving everything out of my body with gale force) so I’ve been neglectful of any and all writing. You just can’t concentrate when you feel like you’re on a roller coaster for four days straight. Now that my stomach (and bowels, sorry) are finally clear, I sit at my laptop racking my brain for a topic for this blog post.

Protect Yourself and Your Work

What comes to mind, as happens this time of year, is what to do come 2020 to protect our work and ourselves in this global digital world. I wrote a blog post on the Digital Legacy of writers and the importance of preparing your legacy (a part 2 post). What I’m thinking is, it’s even more important to be safe and secure in the digital world, which seems to be getting more difficult all the time as hackers and other ne’er-do-wells invade our privacy, our accounts, our lives. 

“You need to be concerned with writer scams popping up all over the web offering unauthorized copies of authors’ books or scamming writers out of money. Writer Beware is one of many sites that track predatory sites and unscrupulous people trying to steal our IP.” A Writer’s Legacy, Part 2

In my calendar for December 26th, I have a reminder to update my logins and passwords. I try to do this at the end of each year or by the end of January of the new year. Better to be safe than sorry, eh? Yeah, it’s a time-consuming pain, I won’t lie… but I do feel better once it’s complete. I feel like maybe I outsmarted the smart guys – at least for another year.

Kiss Gmail and Chrome Goodbye?

You also might want to consider new email accounts despite the obvious challenge to transferring all your saved emails. Google has a hold on me, granted, but I hope to wean myself of their grip little by little (and maybe for good, we’ll see). And I recently began using DuckDuckGo to reduce my online search transparency. They don’t keep a log of sites you visit because they figure it’s your business, not theirs.

Clean out unused apps, apps that track you wherever you are, apps that don’t serve the greater good in your life. Do you really NEED that word game app? Or that app that turns your face into something other than your face? Think about it; our connectivity, while convenient along with the ability to create a whole lot of goodness in the world, also enslaves us at a level unseen by previous generations. Be careful, is all I’m asking.

Storage Safety

Do you keep copies of your manuscripts/poems/works only on your computer? Not the safest option. Keep hard copies or a thumb drive stashed where only you can find them. Do you use cloud accounts? While I’m not 100% convinced they’re completely secure (seems nothing is, these days), it’s a good way to access your work from anywhere. Use strong passwords to better ensure their safety.

The Upsell – Never Fully Secure?

As I write this post, my AVG software pops up to tell me I’m being tracked, that companies are getting my personal information. Talk about timing. But just how much money do we need to spend to be safe? I’ve got a secure program but it’s always popping up to tell me I need more and more to keep my information safe. Beginning to sound like a snake oil salesman, if you ask me. When is enough actually enough for these data protection services?

My advice?

Keep it simple and safe in 2020.