The Rise of Yellow Journalism in the Digital Age: What Writers Can Do About It

A Bit of History

It’s ironic that what began as a feud for readership and sales between two newspaper giants in the late 19th century has become commonplace practice for reporting so-called “news” on social media. Hard to believe it all began with Joseph Pulitzer (for whom the most prestigious award in Journalism is named, ironically), who purchased the New York World in 1883. Pulitzer used a sensational style of reporting for his stories and crusades against political corruption and social injustice to win the largest newspaper circulation in the U.S.

Along came William Randolph Hearst in 1895, who purchased a rival newspaper, the Journal. Hearst’s determination to be number one led him to outdoing all his competitors, including Pulitzer’s New York World,  in sensationalism, crusades, and Sunday features. Hearst stole a cartoonist from Pulitzer, which created a rival picture series that drew so much attention that the term yellow journalism was born.

Yellow journalism and the yellow press are American terms for journalism and associated newspapers that present little or no legitimate, well-researched news while instead using eye-catching headlines for increased sales.” (Wikipedia)

Yellow Journalism Lives on social media

Following the recent siege of the Capitol in Washington, D.C., prompted by both disinformation and misinformation peppered with a deluge of yellow journalism news bytes all over the Internet, I couldn’t help but notice how readily many had accepted what they read on social media sites. TMI, or ‘too much information’  – or more aptly – disinformation, prompted such an outburst as to endanger the lives of people and our political system at its core.

As writers, reporters, and journalists, there is an obligation to maintain the integrity of our words. In a previous post, I cautioned writers and speakers to use words carefully as they have the capacity for great power. In that post, I also wrote: “Write from the compassionate heart, support a peaceful co-existence and community goals, stand your ground without being divisive.” This phrase rings more true now as we face a pandemic, interference with our voting rights/system, and an incoming/new Administration, all susceptible to SM disinformation.

end yellow journalism!

The sheer volume of the 24/7 news cycle is overwhelming. At what point do we say ENOUGH? Are we even able to filter it all? (Of course not.) Or must we choose to step away from the constant download of so much disinformation? Is it possible to discern the true news from the false?

Yellow journalism must not, can not, should not, replace words written with integrity. Fight it but don’t ignore it, show it for what it really is: a pathetic attempt to manipulate the truth for the sake of ratings, attention, or personal and political agendas.

Pledge to maintain the integrity of your words. Promise to use your power wisely. Stop yellow journalism in its tracks.

#journalism #writers #yellowjournalism #politics #tellthetruth #twitter #instagram #democracy #fakenews #stopyellowjournalism #writewithintegrity

The Bloom Is Off The Rose

withered rose

Source: Pixabay

That’s it, I’m done. This morning I read an interesting post by a writer I follow who took a 6-week break from SM (which explains why I didn’t get any new posts from her in my inbox). Many of the comments I read for that post agreed and offered some useful words on how to handle SM if you choose to stay in the game. I’ve posted before on the pros and cons of SM and how much we actually ‘need’ to be on it. I was inspired by her desire to cut the proverbial ties that bound her to her followers and the global writing community, the ties that took her away from her writing time. I constantly struggle with a similar issue. But her honesty encouraged me to take a small step today and I deleted my Goodreads account (for the second, and hopefully, last time) while reorganizing and thinning out my online bookmark manager.

Honestly, why should I give a damn which books complete strangers are reading? And why would they give a damn what I’m reading or have read? FYI – just finished Saving Fish From Drowning by Amy Tan; I hope knowing this changes your life in some way. 🙂

I’ve also wrestled (many times, actually) with closing my Mestengo Books FB page; it contains the same information as my website and I’d rather you visited that over a lackluster FB page. All my FB followers (a whopping 35 people) can visit my website, if so inclined. Well, that’s gone now, too. Whew. A moment of trepidation but I quickly recovered. (And I have fourteen days to make it live again, in case I change my mind and realize I simply can’t live without an ineffective FB page.)

I’ll keep the FB page for my nutrition book; eventually, I’m fairly sure, I’ll tire of that one as well. I’m trying out Instagtram and Twitter for a few months; I don’t spend more than about thirty minutes a day on each (first thing in the morning is best for me) so I don’t yet feel they’re sucking the soul out of me. Give ‘em time.

Does this mean I’m focusing more on productive writing? Not necessarily. I am currently in a predicament that is engulfing almost every moment of almost every day and invading my thoughts almost round the clock . Exhausting. But that’s life: the ups and downs, hills and valleys, ebbs and flows. Due to unforeseen circumstances, my life is currently in that ebb/down/valley so I’m not focused on writing other than this post. Maybe I should be, it would bring a welcome relief from the stress and insomnia.

As I’ve posted before: all we can do, in my opinion, is what’s best for each of us, no matter what the ‘experts’ tout. If you like SM, are good at it, and are finding success with it, then stay the course. Too many people are in burnout mode from the addictive lure of instant success, instant money, instant something. As always with a fad that rapidly becomes popular, (almost) everyone  wants on board, wants their ‘piece of the pie.’ What was once shiny and new quickly fades into oblivion, replaced more quickly by the newest, baddest, greatest, freshest, cheapest, etc. And many of us (writers) are exhausted from trying to keep up. In that realization, a host of writers are backing off, reverting back to doing things ‘the old-fashioned way.’ They’re taking a step back to view the bigger picture. Exhaustion is then replaced with serenity, clarity, and wisdom gained only by the experience.

I will continue to post to my blog because I need it, even if you don’t. And I will make a concerted effort to keep only a small space in my life for SM. The bloom is definitely off that rose for me.

 

What has been your experience with SM? Positive or negative? Care to share? What are some good arguments for keeping up with it? What are some good arguments for letting it go?

 

 

 

Losing Your Mind on Social Media?

This morning I came across an interesting article in one of my LinkedIn Groups, Book Marketing (amidst so many others that are not – at least to me). The author, Kirsten Oliphant, writes about the overwhelm many of us experience these days with Social Media (SM) and how to choose which ones will work best for each of us. As I read the article, knots formed in my stomach. I admit I’m not tech-savvy in the world of SM and just reading about it gives me the willies. She makes a good point, though, at the beginning, about struggling with mastering SM and balancing the marketing we do there with finding time to write.

She provides three options: 1) Hire out (don’t know about you but I certainly can’t afford this option), 2) gripe and procrastinate (welcome to my world), and 3) master and manage (oh, here come the willies again). While she makes valid arguments for all three, I’m focused on the third, master and manage. If only I could learn, understand, and utilize at least a couple of SM to my advantage as a writer.

Good news: Kirsten provides a free resource guide describing many platforms in detail, so that even I, the un-savvy, can understand and utilize SM. She also provides sensible advice: choose one or two platforms you’re comfortable with and start with those. And maybe use only those, as she does advocate not going hog crazy and trying to be everywhere and everything on SM. This makes sense to me, as it allows for time to write (and work a full-time job since writing has not yet completely replaced the J-O-B lifestyle).

Still, I’ve not heard of some of the SM sites she mentions and I’m likely to stay with what’s familiar (Facebook, etc.). I’m toying with opening a Twitter account; have any of you found it to be useful for your published works? I’m just not a big fan of being “followed” by anyone, and evidently I have to follow others first for that to happen. And by nature I tend not to follow others – rather, I prefer to take my own, less-traveled road, so I don’t know if Twitter is right for me. Which means I need to read her booklet in more detail, because who knows what I may discover. Perhaps I’ll find a SM site that doesn’t overwhelm or confuse me; perhaps I’ll discover an inroad to a new marketing adventure. Regardless, I know I’ll learn something that can help me to the next step in the process, all the while not losing my mind over the there-are-too-many-options-to-choose-from menu of Social Media.

You can check out the full article here.